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Program for disabilities

PROGRAMS FOR DISABILITIES

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Program for disabilities

DYSLEXIA


Reading and related language based processing skills.

Reading fluency

Decoding, recall, writing and spelling

Reading comprehension, speech


DYSGRAPHIA


That affects a person’s handwriting ability and fine motor skills. Problems may include illegible handwriting, inconsistent spacing,poor spatial planning on paper,poor spelling and difficulty composing writing as well as thinking and writing at the same time.


DYSCALCULIA


Affects a person’s ability to understand number and learn math facts. LD may also have poor comprehension of math symbols, may struggle with memorizing and organizing numbers have difficulty telling time.


NON-VERBAL LEARNING DISABILITIES


Characterized by a significant discrepancy b/w higher verbal skills and weaker motor visual spatial and social skill.


VISUAL PERCEPTUAL / VISUAL MOTOR DEFICITAUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER ( APD )


Adversely affects how sound that travels unimpeded via ear is processed or interpreted by the brain.


NON-VERBAL LEARNING DISABILITIES


Characterized by a significant discrepancy b/w higher verbal skills and weaker motor visual spatial and social skill.


ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER ( ADHD )


Difficulty staying focused and paying attention.

Difficulty controlling behavior and hyperactivity.

30 to 50 % of children with ADHD.

Specific learning disability.


VISUAL PERCEPTUAL / VISUAL MOTOR DEFICITAUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER ( APD )


Adversely affects how sound that travels unimpeded via ear is processed or interpreted by the brain.


PSYCHOTHERAPY OR TALK THERAPY:


It is a process focused on helping you heal and learn more constructive ways to deal with the problems.


BEHAVIOR THERAPY


Is focused on helping an individual understand how changing their behavior can lead to changes in how they are feeling.


GOAL:


Focused inincreasing the person’s engagement in positive or socially reinforcing activities.


COMMON TECHNIQUES:


Self -monitoring

Schedule of weekly activities

Role playing

Behavior modification


COGNITIVE THERAPY


Is based on the theory that much of how positive feel is determined by what we think

Personalization

Dichotomous thinking

Selective abstraction Magnification-minimization


DIALECTRIAL BEHAVIOUR THERAPY:


It is a type of cognitive- behavioral psychotherapy.

Individual weekly psychotherapy session

Weekly group therapy session


INTERPERSONAL THERAPY:


Focus on IPR of the depressed person

Identification of emotion

Expression of emotion

Dealing with emotional baggage


FAMILY THERAPY:


View a person symptom as taking place in the largest context of the family without understanding that larger group.

Genogram

Systemic interpretation

Communication training


GROUP THERAPY


Modeling

Increases feedback

Less expensive

Improve social skills

DVD Teaching

ADHD Profile Test


READING DISABILITIES


When a Student has difficulty with reading.it can be overwhelming to teachers and emotional for both parents and students.

Parents and teachers can act on behalf of a student who struggles with reading by trying the pinpoint the nature and source of a student difficulty by skills levels and by building upon his or her strength.


ASSESSMENTS


ORAL AND WRITTEN LANGUAGE SCALES (owls)

TEST FOR ADOLESCENT AND ADULT LANGUAGE(TOAL3)

TEST FOR EARLY WRITTEN LANGUAGE

TEST FOR WRITTEN LANGUAGE-3(towl3)


ADHD SCHOOL


Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (commonly referred to as ADHD) is a condition that develops in childhood and is characterized by problems with attention, impulse control, and hyperactivity. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), ADHD is a problem for approximately nine percent of American children from ages thirteen to eighteen, with boys being four times more at risk than girls.

If you are a teacher of a child with ADHD, this list of eighteen simple strategies to help students learn is for you.

18 SimpleSchoolStrategies for Students with ADHD Helpful Techniques for Teachers and Parents

Strategies for the Classroom

Classroom rules should be clear and concise and reviewed regularly with the student. It is helpful to have the child repeat back rules, expectations or other instructions to make sure they are understood. These rules should be posted prominently in the classroom.

Because students with ADHD are susceptible to distractions, seat the student close to the teacher. Make sure he or she is seated away from easy distractions, such as doors, windows, cubby areas or pencil sharpeners.

Give the student frequent and immediate feedback or consequences about behaviors.

Catch the student being good and give him immediate praise. Ignore negative behaviors that are minimal and not disruptive.

Use rewards and incentives before punishment to motivate the student and to help keep school feeling like a positive place. Change up the rewards frequently to help prevent the student from becoming bored.

Allow student frequent physical breaks to move around (to hand out or collect materials, run errands to the office or other areas in the school building, erase the board, get a drink of water at the water fountain, etc.)

Allow some restlessness at work area. Allow students to stand up at his desk if it helps him stay on task.

Tape an index card to the student’s desk with written class rules. Help him keep track of the schedule by reviewing it with him at various times during the day and prepare him for each transition.

Limit distractions, excessive noise, distracting visual stimuli, clutter, etc. (For some kids with ADHD listening to "white noise" or soft background music can help concentration and focus).

Reduce the student’s total workload. Break work down into smaller sections.

Give concise one or two step directions. Avoid "overloading" with too much info.

Place a hand on the student’s shoulder, hand or arm while talking to him in order to help him stay focused on what is said.

Allow the student to hold a small "kosher ball" or silly putty or something tactile for him to manipulate. This slight stimulation often helps keep an ADHD child focused.

If the school allows it, some students benefit from chewing gum to release energy and keep concentration.

Schedule the most difficult subjects in the morning time when the student (and the whole class) is fresher and less fatigued.

Do not use loss of recess as a consequence for negative behavior. (ADHD kids benefit from the physical movement that occurs during recess and can usually focus better following this exercise).

Use timers, taped time signals, or verbal cues to show how much time the student has remaining for an activity.

Pair the student with a “study buddy” –- a kind and mature classroom peer who can help give reminders or refocus the child when he gets off track. A successful strategy to effectively educate students with ADHD includes a triad that includes academic instruction, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations. When these strategies are applied more regularly in the classroom, they will benefit not only students with ADHD but the entire learning environment.

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